A Guru is s/he who has the capacity to deliver man from the sea of becoming

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CAROL LOVELIGHT: Carol says “Photos of my own Beloved Guru, Sri Anandamayi Ma, with the beautiful Bengali devotional song “Daayal Guru Go”, sung by Himanshu Goswami (from the album “Ore Mon Pagla” – Bengali Folk Songs). “A Guru is he who has the capacity to deliver man from the sea of becoming (bhava sagara)” ~ Anandamayi Ma”

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Exquisite Hindu chant

 

 

Photos of Sri Anandamayi Ma and Arunachala, Holy Mountain of Shiva, with the poem “The Tree of Knowledge of Brahman Part One” written by the 8th century mystic Adi Shankara, performed by Shivoham (sung by Aparna Panshikar and sarod by Bhargar Mistry), from the album “Shankara”.

“The Self is an ocean without a shore….”

“The Self is an ocean without a shore….”

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“The Self is an ocean without a shore. Gazing upon it has no beginning or end, in this world and the next.” – Ibn Arabi (1165 – 1240)

Our true Self is an infinite Ocean. The clue is in the capital ‘S’. Ibn Arabi like all mystic teachers is pointing to the infinite Whole, the Formless, out of which we, and all things emanate. 

Our lower self, our ego gets in the way – until we surrender to the reality of the Whole by quieting our fears & attachments and pierce illusion that we are self-subsisting.

Enjoy three breaths of conscious breathing – as taught by this Zen Master HERE

 

The need to de-mystify the mystical

Thanks to Lee for reminding us that in the One Garden journey we have been trying over the last few years to de-mystify the mystical.

Lee sent the following quotation;

“The most unfortunate thing about the concept of mysticism is that the word itself has become mystified and relegated to a “misty” and distant realm that implies it is only available to a very few. For me, the word simply means experiential knowledge of spiritual things, as opposed to book knowledge, secondhand knowledge, seminary or church knowledge.” – Father Richard Rohr

 

 

Stuck? – let go that guilt tripping

 

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“If the inner mind is not deluded, then outer deeds will not be wrong.” attributed as a Tibetan Buddhist Teaching. (Desmond Biddulph 1001 Pearls of Buddhist Wisdom No. 770)

Self care is necessary if our ‘light is to shine through’ as old hymns used to tell us. It is also a prerequisite if we are to be there for others effectively.

We should bring our self to account each day as the Baha’i teachings teach – but beware becoming frozen through diffuse & unwarranted guilt.

Guilt can be a hiding place, a layer of ego, a dimension of the false self.

Why let go our false self?  Because we are part of the context or environment that shapes other people’s lives. We can’t be a good lover of others if we are inwardly choking on self – the energy, chi, life-force is stuck. We need to forgive ourselves and free up the stuck life-force so that we can serve others more deeply.

Unwarranted guilt is just another form of ego – the delusion is that we are an entity that is self-subsisting.  Only Ultimate Reality – God if you prefer – is Self-subsisting.  ‘We interbeing are,” as the beloved Thich Nhat Hanh says and we do not have the right to hide our light under a bushel – or anywhere else!

PRACTICE:

I = Awareness – coming home, back to Now is to ‘rest as Awareness’

OH JOY: – from the Coen Brothers ‘The Ladykillers’ this great gospel version;

TAGS: guilt, letting go, false self, let your light shine, interspiritual, interfaith as interspiritual living,

 

 

The benefits of Meditation in relation to anxiety

A post by Dr Mercola includes a section on ‘The Benefits of Meditation’ in relation to anxiety. you can find it HERE

The Benefits of Meditation

Meditation is another option that can help you combat anxiety in the long-term. One style of meditation is mindfulness—a directed-attention, waking state practice in which you keep bringing your attention back to the now. It’s a practice of single-tasking, originally developed for monks, who remain focused on the present moment in all activities. Besides improving your focus and boosting your mental cognition, mindfulness training helps relieve feelings of stress and anxiety.

If you think about it, nothing is uncertain in the NOW. You know exactly where you are and what you’re doing right this very moment, so by focusing on your direct experience in the present, uncertainty-driven anxiety can be reduced. With practice, you’ll likely lower your “intolerance of uncertainty” score.

It’s now becoming more well-known that meditation actually changes your brain.16 The increased calm and quiet you feel is not an imaginary effect. Neuroscientist Sara Lazar has used brain scans to look at the meditating brain, which shows that long-term meditators have an increased amount of gray matter in the insula and sensory regions. They also have more gray matter in the frontal cortex, an area associated with memory and executive decision making.

After just eight weeks, people who took part in a mindfulness meditation study, meditating 40 minutes per day, were able to shrink their amygdala—the part of your brain that governs your fight or flight response, and plays a significant role in anxiety, fear, and general stress. A smaller amygdala correlates to reduced stress and anxiety.

Beware the side effects of Medical Drugs

CIPRO belongs to the group of drugs known as fluoroquinolones.  It can be particularly vicious if used for minor ailments – check out the video & try putting Cipro, Levaquin, Avelox or fluoroquinolones into YouTube and see people’s devastating sufferings;

More videos about his class of drugs follow on.

On CIPRO (the others are just as bad) WikiPedia reports;

Side effects[edit]

Rates of side effects appear to be higher than with some groups of antibiotics such as cephalosporins but lower than with others such as clindamycin.[3] Compared to other antibiotics some studies find a higher rate of side effects[44][45] while others find no difference.[46]

In pre-approval clinical trials of ciprofloxacin most of the adverse events reported were described as mild or moderate in severity, abated soon after the drug was discontinued, and required no treatment.[47] Ciprofloxacin was discontinued because of an adverse event in 1% of people treated with the medication by mouth. The most frequently reported drug-related events, from trials of all formulations, all dosages, all drug-therapy durations, and for all indications, were nausea (2.5%), diarrhea (1.6%), abnormal liver function tests (1.3%), vomiting (1%), and rash (1%). Other adverse events occurred at rates of <1%.

Tendinitis[edit]

The black box warning on the U.S. FDA-approved ciprofloxacin label warns of an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture, especially in people who are older than 60 years, people who also use corticosteroids, and people with kidney, lung, or heart transplants. Tendon rupture can occur during therapy or even months after discontinuation of the drug.[48] A case control study[49] performed using a UK medical care database found that fluoroquinolone use was associated with a 1.9-fold increase in tendon problems. The relative risk increased to 3.2 in those over 60 years of age and to 6.2 in those over the age of 60 who were also taking corticosteroids. Among the 46,766 quinolone users in the study, 38 (0.1%) cases of Achilles tendon rupture were identified. A study performed using an Italian healthcare database reached qualitatively similar conclusions.[50]

Nervous system[edit]

The 2013 FDA label warns of nervous system effects. Ciprofloxacin, like other fluoroquinolones, is known to trigger seizures or lower the seizure threshold, and may cause other central nervous system side effects. Headache, dizziness, and insomnia have been reported as occurring fairly commonly in postapproval review articles, along with a much lower incidence of serious CNS side effects such as tremors, psychosis, anxiety, hallucinations, paranoia, and suicide attempts, especially at higher doses.[3] Like other fluoroquinolones, it is also known to cause peripheral neuropathy that may be irreversible, such as weakness, burning pain, tingling, or numbness.[51]

Cancer[edit]

Ciprofloxacin is active in six of eight in vitro assays used as rapid screens for the detection of genotoxic effects, but is not active in in vivo assays of genotoxicity.[52] Long-term carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice resulted in no carcinogenic or tumorigenic effects due to ciprofloxacin at daily oral dose levels up to 250 and 750 mg/kg to rats and mice, respectively (about 1.7 and 2.5 times the highest recommended therapeutic dose based upon mg/m2). Results from photo co-carcinogenicity testing indicate ciprofloxacin does not reduce the time to appearance of UV-induced skin tumors as compared to vehicle control.

Other[edit]

The other black box warning is that ciprofloxacin should not be used in patients with myasthenia gravis due to possible exacerbation of muscle weakness which may lead to breathing problems resulting in death or ventilator support. Fluoroquinolones are known to block neuromuscular transmission. [53]

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a serious adverse effect of ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones; it is unclear whether the risk is higher than with other broad-spectrum antibiotics.[54]

A wide range of rare but potentially fatal side effects spontaneously reported to the U.S. FDA or the subject of case reports published in medical journals includes, but is not limited to, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, heart arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or QT prolongation), allergic pneumonitis, bone marrow suppression, hepatitis or liver failure,[55] and sensitivity to light. The drug should be discontinued if a rash, jaundice, or other sign of hypersentitivity occur.[56]

Children and the elderly are at a much greater risk of experiencing adverse reactions.[57][58]

Overdose[edit]

Overdose of ciprofloxacin may result in reversible renal toxicity. Treatment of overdose includes emptying of the stomach by induced vomiting or gastric lavage, as well as administration of antacids containing magnesium, aluminum, or calcium to reduce drug absorption. Renal function and urinary pH should be monitored. Important support includes adequate hydration and urine acidification if necessary to prevent crystalluria. Hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis can only remove less than 10% of ciprofloxacin.[59]Ciprofloxacin may be quantified in plasma or serum to monitor for drug accumulation in patients with hepatic dysfunction or to confirm a diagnosis of poisoning in acute overdose victims.[60]

Side effects[edit]

Rates of side effects appear to be higher than with some groups of antibiotics such as cephalosporins but lower than with others such as clindamycin.[3] Compared to other antibiotics some studies find a higher rate of side effects[44][45] while others find no difference.[46]

In pre-approval clinical trials of ciprofloxacin most of the adverse events reported were described as mild or moderate in severity, abated soon after the drug was discontinued, and required no treatment.[47] Ciprofloxacin was discontinued because of an adverse event in 1% of people treated with the medication by mouth. The most frequently reported drug-related events, from trials of all formulations, all dosages, all drug-therapy durations, and for all indications, were nausea (2.5%), diarrhea (1.6%), abnormal liver function tests (1.3%), vomiting (1%), and rash (1%). Other adverse events occurred at rates of <1%.

Tendinitis[edit]

The black box warning on the U.S. FDA-approved ciprofloxacin label warns of an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture, especially in people who are older than 60 years, people who also use corticosteroids, and people with kidney, lung, or heart transplants. Tendon rupture can occur during therapy or even months after discontinuation of the drug.[48] A case control study[49] performed using a UK medical care database found that fluoroquinolone use was associated with a 1.9-fold increase in tendon problems. The relative risk increased to 3.2 in those over 60 years of age and to 6.2 in those over the age of 60 who were also taking corticosteroids. Among the 46,766 quinolone users in the study, 38 (0.1%) cases of Achilles tendon rupture were identified. A study performed using an Italian healthcare database reached qualitatively similar conclusions.[50]

Nervous system[edit]

The 2013 FDA label warns of nervous system effects. Ciprofloxacin, like other fluoroquinolones, is known to trigger seizures or lower the seizure threshold, and may cause other central nervous system side effects. Headache, dizziness, and insomnia have been reported as occurring fairly commonly in postapproval review articles, along with a much lower incidence of serious CNS side effects such as tremors, psychosis, anxiety, hallucinations, paranoia, and suicide attempts, especially at higher doses.[3] Like other fluoroquinolones, it is also known to cause peripheral neuropathy that may be irreversible, such as weakness, burning pain, tingling, or numbness.[51]

Cancer[edit]

Ciprofloxacin is active in six of eight in vitro assays used as rapid screens for the detection of genotoxic effects, but is not active in in vivo assays of genotoxicity.[52] Long-term carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice resulted in no carcinogenic or tumorigenic effects due to ciprofloxacin at daily oral dose levels up to 250 and 750 mg/kg to rats and mice, respectively (about 1.7 and 2.5 times the highest recommended therapeutic dose based upon mg/m2). Results from photo co-carcinogenicity testing indicate ciprofloxacin does not reduce the time to appearance of UV-induced skin tumors as compared to vehicle control.

Other[edit]

The other black box warning is that ciprofloxacin should not be used in patients with myasthenia gravis due to possible exacerbation of muscle weakness which may lead to breathing problems resulting in death or ventilator support. Fluoroquinolones are known to block neuromuscular transmission. [53]

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a serious adverse effect of ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones; it is unclear whether the risk is higher than with other broad-spectrum antibiotics.[54]

A wide range of rare but potentially fatal side effects spontaneously reported to the U.S. FDA or the subject of case reports published in medical journals includes, but is not limited to, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, heart arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or QT prolongation), allergic pneumonitis, bone marrow suppression, hepatitis or liver failure,[55] and sensitivity to light. The drug should be discontinued if a rash, jaundice, or other sign of hypersentitivity occur.[56]

Children and the elderly are at a much greater risk of experiencing adverse reactions.[57][58]

Overdose[edit]

Overdose of ciprofloxacin may result in reversible renal toxicity. Treatment of overdose includes emptying of the stomach by induced vomiting or gastric lavage, as well as administration of antacids containing magnesium, aluminum, or calcium to reduce drug absorption. Renal function and urinary pH should be monitored. Important support includes adequate hydration and urine acidification if necessary to prevent crystalluria. Hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis can only remove less than 10% of ciprofloxacin.[59]Ciprofloxacin may be quantified in plasma or serum to monitor for drug accumulation in patients with hepatic dysfunction or to confirm a diagnosis of poisoning in acute overdose victims.[60]