Beware the side effects of Medical Drugs

CIPRO belongs to the group of drugs known as fluoroquinolones.  It can be particularly vicious if used for minor ailments – check out the video & try putting Cipro, Levaquin, Avelox or fluoroquinolones into YouTube and see people’s devastating sufferings;

More videos about his class of drugs follow on.

On CIPRO (the others are just as bad) WikiPedia reports;

Side effects[edit]

Rates of side effects appear to be higher than with some groups of antibiotics such as cephalosporins but lower than with others such as clindamycin.[3] Compared to other antibiotics some studies find a higher rate of side effects[44][45] while others find no difference.[46]

In pre-approval clinical trials of ciprofloxacin most of the adverse events reported were described as mild or moderate in severity, abated soon after the drug was discontinued, and required no treatment.[47] Ciprofloxacin was discontinued because of an adverse event in 1% of people treated with the medication by mouth. The most frequently reported drug-related events, from trials of all formulations, all dosages, all drug-therapy durations, and for all indications, were nausea (2.5%), diarrhea (1.6%), abnormal liver function tests (1.3%), vomiting (1%), and rash (1%). Other adverse events occurred at rates of <1%.

Tendinitis[edit]

The black box warning on the U.S. FDA-approved ciprofloxacin label warns of an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture, especially in people who are older than 60 years, people who also use corticosteroids, and people with kidney, lung, or heart transplants. Tendon rupture can occur during therapy or even months after discontinuation of the drug.[48] A case control study[49] performed using a UK medical care database found that fluoroquinolone use was associated with a 1.9-fold increase in tendon problems. The relative risk increased to 3.2 in those over 60 years of age and to 6.2 in those over the age of 60 who were also taking corticosteroids. Among the 46,766 quinolone users in the study, 38 (0.1%) cases of Achilles tendon rupture were identified. A study performed using an Italian healthcare database reached qualitatively similar conclusions.[50]

Nervous system[edit]

The 2013 FDA label warns of nervous system effects. Ciprofloxacin, like other fluoroquinolones, is known to trigger seizures or lower the seizure threshold, and may cause other central nervous system side effects. Headache, dizziness, and insomnia have been reported as occurring fairly commonly in postapproval review articles, along with a much lower incidence of serious CNS side effects such as tremors, psychosis, anxiety, hallucinations, paranoia, and suicide attempts, especially at higher doses.[3] Like other fluoroquinolones, it is also known to cause peripheral neuropathy that may be irreversible, such as weakness, burning pain, tingling, or numbness.[51]

Cancer[edit]

Ciprofloxacin is active in six of eight in vitro assays used as rapid screens for the detection of genotoxic effects, but is not active in in vivo assays of genotoxicity.[52] Long-term carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice resulted in no carcinogenic or tumorigenic effects due to ciprofloxacin at daily oral dose levels up to 250 and 750 mg/kg to rats and mice, respectively (about 1.7 and 2.5 times the highest recommended therapeutic dose based upon mg/m2). Results from photo co-carcinogenicity testing indicate ciprofloxacin does not reduce the time to appearance of UV-induced skin tumors as compared to vehicle control.

Other[edit]

The other black box warning is that ciprofloxacin should not be used in patients with myasthenia gravis due to possible exacerbation of muscle weakness which may lead to breathing problems resulting in death or ventilator support. Fluoroquinolones are known to block neuromuscular transmission. [53]

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a serious adverse effect of ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones; it is unclear whether the risk is higher than with other broad-spectrum antibiotics.[54]

A wide range of rare but potentially fatal side effects spontaneously reported to the U.S. FDA or the subject of case reports published in medical journals includes, but is not limited to, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, heart arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or QT prolongation), allergic pneumonitis, bone marrow suppression, hepatitis or liver failure,[55] and sensitivity to light. The drug should be discontinued if a rash, jaundice, or other sign of hypersentitivity occur.[56]

Children and the elderly are at a much greater risk of experiencing adverse reactions.[57][58]

Overdose[edit]

Overdose of ciprofloxacin may result in reversible renal toxicity. Treatment of overdose includes emptying of the stomach by induced vomiting or gastric lavage, as well as administration of antacids containing magnesium, aluminum, or calcium to reduce drug absorption. Renal function and urinary pH should be monitored. Important support includes adequate hydration and urine acidification if necessary to prevent crystalluria. Hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis can only remove less than 10% of ciprofloxacin.[59]Ciprofloxacin may be quantified in plasma or serum to monitor for drug accumulation in patients with hepatic dysfunction or to confirm a diagnosis of poisoning in acute overdose victims.[60]

Side effects[edit]

Rates of side effects appear to be higher than with some groups of antibiotics such as cephalosporins but lower than with others such as clindamycin.[3] Compared to other antibiotics some studies find a higher rate of side effects[44][45] while others find no difference.[46]

In pre-approval clinical trials of ciprofloxacin most of the adverse events reported were described as mild or moderate in severity, abated soon after the drug was discontinued, and required no treatment.[47] Ciprofloxacin was discontinued because of an adverse event in 1% of people treated with the medication by mouth. The most frequently reported drug-related events, from trials of all formulations, all dosages, all drug-therapy durations, and for all indications, were nausea (2.5%), diarrhea (1.6%), abnormal liver function tests (1.3%), vomiting (1%), and rash (1%). Other adverse events occurred at rates of <1%.

Tendinitis[edit]

The black box warning on the U.S. FDA-approved ciprofloxacin label warns of an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture, especially in people who are older than 60 years, people who also use corticosteroids, and people with kidney, lung, or heart transplants. Tendon rupture can occur during therapy or even months after discontinuation of the drug.[48] A case control study[49] performed using a UK medical care database found that fluoroquinolone use was associated with a 1.9-fold increase in tendon problems. The relative risk increased to 3.2 in those over 60 years of age and to 6.2 in those over the age of 60 who were also taking corticosteroids. Among the 46,766 quinolone users in the study, 38 (0.1%) cases of Achilles tendon rupture were identified. A study performed using an Italian healthcare database reached qualitatively similar conclusions.[50]

Nervous system[edit]

The 2013 FDA label warns of nervous system effects. Ciprofloxacin, like other fluoroquinolones, is known to trigger seizures or lower the seizure threshold, and may cause other central nervous system side effects. Headache, dizziness, and insomnia have been reported as occurring fairly commonly in postapproval review articles, along with a much lower incidence of serious CNS side effects such as tremors, psychosis, anxiety, hallucinations, paranoia, and suicide attempts, especially at higher doses.[3] Like other fluoroquinolones, it is also known to cause peripheral neuropathy that may be irreversible, such as weakness, burning pain, tingling, or numbness.[51]

Cancer[edit]

Ciprofloxacin is active in six of eight in vitro assays used as rapid screens for the detection of genotoxic effects, but is not active in in vivo assays of genotoxicity.[52] Long-term carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice resulted in no carcinogenic or tumorigenic effects due to ciprofloxacin at daily oral dose levels up to 250 and 750 mg/kg to rats and mice, respectively (about 1.7 and 2.5 times the highest recommended therapeutic dose based upon mg/m2). Results from photo co-carcinogenicity testing indicate ciprofloxacin does not reduce the time to appearance of UV-induced skin tumors as compared to vehicle control.

Other[edit]

The other black box warning is that ciprofloxacin should not be used in patients with myasthenia gravis due to possible exacerbation of muscle weakness which may lead to breathing problems resulting in death or ventilator support. Fluoroquinolones are known to block neuromuscular transmission. [53]

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a serious adverse effect of ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones; it is unclear whether the risk is higher than with other broad-spectrum antibiotics.[54]

A wide range of rare but potentially fatal side effects spontaneously reported to the U.S. FDA or the subject of case reports published in medical journals includes, but is not limited to, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, heart arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or QT prolongation), allergic pneumonitis, bone marrow suppression, hepatitis or liver failure,[55] and sensitivity to light. The drug should be discontinued if a rash, jaundice, or other sign of hypersentitivity occur.[56]

Children and the elderly are at a much greater risk of experiencing adverse reactions.[57][58]

Overdose[edit]

Overdose of ciprofloxacin may result in reversible renal toxicity. Treatment of overdose includes emptying of the stomach by induced vomiting or gastric lavage, as well as administration of antacids containing magnesium, aluminum, or calcium to reduce drug absorption. Renal function and urinary pH should be monitored. Important support includes adequate hydration and urine acidification if necessary to prevent crystalluria. Hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis can only remove less than 10% of ciprofloxacin.[59]Ciprofloxacin may be quantified in plasma or serum to monitor for drug accumulation in patients with hepatic dysfunction or to confirm a diagnosis of poisoning in acute overdose victims.[60]

Author: Roger - Dr Roger Prentice

Now I write, teach & coach mainly about interfaith as inter-spirituality - and how we can grow closer to our True Self. . As anyone who knows anything about IPF will realize my energy is curtailed - so I am concentrating primarily on 'inter-spirituality'. . In the past I would have said that: . 1) I run courses and give talks at conferences and in universities and colleges in the UK, China, USA, Canada, Scandinavia etc. . 2) I provide materials, outlines and lessons for Schools. . 3) My range of interests include personal development, learning and teaching, photography and film, the arts generally, spirituality and educational practice and theory. . 4) At the same time I continue developing the human-centred studies SunWALK PDS (People Development System) - a whole-person, high-achievement model for individuals, and for use in, NGOs, schools and other organizations. . 5) The key question that continues to animate me and my work remains, "What is it to be fully and positively human?" . Contact me via onesummit AT gmail DOT com (replace At with@ etc.). . All good wishes Roger (Dr Roger Prentice) . For those interested; My first degree is in English and Education. My masters is in Adult and Community Education. My doctorate presented a new holistic meta-model of education called SunWALK.

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