Welcome to ‘Soul Needs-One Garden’!

Welcome to ‘Soul Needs-One Garden: living inter-spiritually, realizing Oneness

*NEW* –  you are on  this my main 6-projects-in-one site.  PLEASE ‘like’ my other sites;
The specialist inter-spirituality site: HERE     The FaceBook inter-spiritual page: HERE

The 6-projects-in-one Facebook: HERE     The inter-spiritual discussion group: HERE

The PhD – is a model of Holistic Education for parents, teachers and managers. Within it is SunWALK, a model of what it is to be fully and positively human – very readable, not technical – & it’s HERE !

Twitter for all 6 projects is HERE      My ‘street photography’ is HERE

NB – All new posts are below this welcome message.


SOUL NEEDS – ONE GARDEN – via 6 projects is my main blog-site, a  flow of  life-journey moments and a continuation of  my PhD  – Roger (Dr R Prentice)  EMAIL: onesummit AT gmail DOT com

Piano player only 52kb

Photograph ‘The peripatetic piano man Brighton’ by  Roger Prentice

THE 6 PROJECTS: My primary focus is now ‘perennial-spirituality’ 21stC interfaith – (the ‘changeless faith’ as Baha’is call it) but within that are  5 other projects  1) Artmatters,  inc photography   2) Natural Health matters (inc surviving IPF), 3) Personal Development & Management,  4) Re-humanizing Education (inc. Holistic Education)  5) Social Justice matters.  The 5 I hope are integrated within 6) ‘Inter-spirituality’ since  I am now realizing it as the context for the other 5.


Inter-spirituality is “the recovery of the shared mystic heart beating in the center of the world’s deepest spiritual traditions.” – Wayne Teasdale, see HERE   
My definition of inter-spirituality = ‘the state of being, and the living of life, that flow from the realization of the Oneness beyond the various wisdom traditions.’  – As in ‘Namaste’, “I honor the place in you in which the entire Universe dwells. I honor the place in you which is of Love, of Integrity, of Wisdom and of Peace. When you are in that place in you, and I am in that place in me, we are One.”
RP “Behind every moment, behind every particular, is the enveloping Whole.   We have 2 wings; being in the Whole, from which we emanate and  secondly delight in every particular.” – My heart has come to harbour every form’ ! 
Mindfulness allows us to spend more time in eternity!”
My daily Quotations Treasury blog is HERE      Resources for ONE GARDEN groups – i.e interfaith interspirituality is HERE    My photography is HERE – use left & right arrows to view!   EN-JOY – please send in a ‘like’, comment, discussion point or question! – All new posts are below this welcome post – thanks for dropping by – Roger.  

I’m touching base with all…

I’m touching base with all the music that moves me most;

Create in me a pure heart…

Create in me a pure heart, O my God, and renew a tranquil conscience within me, O my Hope! Through the spirit of power confirm Thou me in Thy Cause, O my Best-Beloved, and by the light of Thy glory reveal unto me Thy path, O Thou the Goal of my desire! Through the power of Thy transcendent might lift me up unto the heaven of Thy holiness, O Source of my being, and by the breezes of Thine eternity gladden me, O Thou Who art my God! Let Thine everlasting melodies breathe tranquillity on me, O my Companion, and let the riches of Thine ancient countenance deliver me from all except Thee, O my Master, and let the tidings of the revelation of Thine incorruptible Essence bring me joy, O Thou Who art the most manifest of the manifest and the most hidden of the hidden!


I would give every scrap…

I would give every scrap of my little bit of learning to do what this man does;

A great song for those…

A great song for those who love humanity – by the great Red Grammer

Hindu – The Glorious Bhagavad Gita: Sung in English

I am re-posting these two wonderful resources;

On the basis that I wanted to taste water from all great wells I was made very happy to find a way to connect with Hindu scriptures. I refer to the online English translation sung by Sharon Janis that you can listen to HERE.


You can listen and have open in front of you the text of the Bhagavad Gita in English HERE – wonderful!

Her book Spirituality for Dummies is also excellent – don’t be put off by the title. It provides an excellent framework for Perennial Philosophy or Universalism. – Chapter 1 is here.

HAFIZ & RUMI: poetry as the healing for our daily suffering

What a great interview about an amazing writer – ‘Something Missing In My Heart – Daniel Ladinsky On The God-Intoxicated Poetry Of Hafiz by ANDREW LAWLER’;

Here is one of my favourite extracts;

Before our first chat, at a coffee shop following his Mardi Gras reading, he apologized to three teenagers for inadvertently cutting in line. Though they protested that he hadn’t, he pressed a few dollars into their hands and later inscribed two of his books to them as gifts, chatting affably, asking their birthdays, and reading each one the appropriate poem from A Year with Hafiz.

Lawler: Do you always engage the world like that?

Ladinsky: Rumi and Hafiz can have a great effect on the young. They can safeguard them and point them in the right direction. They are like that Emmylou Harris song: “I would swim the sea for to ease your pain.” They are pain eaters. I see fine poems, whether by Rumi or Hafiz or Mary Oliver or [Rainer Maria] Rilke or Walt Whitman, as baby salvations.

I think so many people in the West are fragmented, and if I hadn’t been so fragmented when I was young, I would have felt the miracle of all this beauty that we are immersed in. The average person suffers all day long, and it is a rare moment when I’m not doing battle. If I have thirty minutes of peace in a day, that’s a lot. And even then it comes in snatches of five minutes here and five minutes there. All creatures are doing everything they can to have a sense of well-being. Rumi and Hafiz can help you in those battles.

Lawler: What do you mean by “battles”?

Ladinsky: Rumi says:

Great lions can find peace in a cage.

But we should only do that as a last resort.

So those bars I see that restrain your wings,

I guess you won’t mind if I pry them open.

Every single poem by Rumi and Hafiz offers people more freedom. What is freedom? It is not suffering from the tyranny of the past or the future, from the anxiety about tomorrow or the unresolved things of yesterday. It is seeing something of the wonder of this moment. It is not a dull experience. The freer one becomes, the more magical the world. And if there is any sanity in us, all we care about is love. We want to be in love, because that is the greatest freedom in this mad, mad, mad world.

‘Something Missing In My Heart – Daniel Ladinsky On The God-Intoxicated Poetry Of Hafiz by ANDREW LAWLER’

Ken Wilber – on loving…

Ken Wilber – on loving until it hurts – women’s spiritual practice

In “Love Until It Hurts,” Ken discusses the nature of women’s spiritual practice and suggests some of the important ways that it differs from men’s.

Uploaded to YouTube Nov 14, 2006

BREATH MATTERS – YOUR FIRST, LAST BREATH ….and all the ones in between

BREATH MATTERS YOUR FIRST, LAST BREATH and all the ones in between Session 34 26th Aug 2015

“I’m gonna lay down my burdens down by the riverside

Down by the riverside down by the riverside……”

breathCheck out lots of intersting stuff at http://contrailscience.com/contrails-are-condensation-but-not-like-your-breath/


Many people for whom ‘God’ is a problem are carrying unnecessary baggage.  Perhaps they have got used to it as a barrier – we often are attached, if not addicted to, our pain.  Alternatives to anthropomorphised God include ‘Ultimate Being’ or ‘Mystery” or ‘The Whole’ or Source – or ‘Breath of the Holy Spirit’ (chi?) that unites  We are referring to the ‘All that isn’t you’ – unless you insist on being the Godhead and all its manifestations!  Such egotism in us is usually because of the ‘negatives’ of fear, depression and anxiety.

A good old hymn that we used to sing at my secondary-modern school was “Breathe on me breath of God.”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5keJHZdWYM

1 Breathe on me, Breath of God,
fill me with life anew,
that I may love the way you love,
and do what you would do.
2 Breathe on me, Breath of God,
until my heart is pure,
until my will is one with yours,
to do and to endure.
3 Breathe on me, Breath of God,
so shall I never die,
but live with you the perfect life
for all eternity.                                                  by Edwin Hatch

Look again at such ‘simple’ teachings in the light of say Eckhart Tolle. All things do get made new.  Part of the joyous benefits of developing an interspiritual world-view is discovery how profound were at least parts of the early spiritual experience that we had rejected.  The process of thesis-antithesis-synthesis is something that many of us go through.  The purpose of this session is to praise and appreciate this longish extract from Richard Rohr’s brilliant talk given in Australia.

Richard Rohr’s wonderful books are HERE

Richard Rohr;  I don’t want to come to Townsville and not give you my best, although it’s not mine at all. But I want to give you a practice. I believe that if we are going to have a lay spirituality, it’s going to depend not on giving them new doctrines to believe or new dogmas to believe which ask almost nothing of you in terms of real transformation or enlightenment. We have to move from a belief base to a practice base. We don’t believe things because Fr said, or the Bishop said, or even the Pope said it. You believe things because you have walked a journey and you know it to be true for yourself. That’s what spiritual practice is. That’s what lay spirituality needs to be. And I’m going to give you a practice and without exaggeration, could, and for some of you, I have no doubt, will change your life. Because I get probably two letters or emails a week telling me that is exactly the case.

About six years ago, I went to a conference in Santa Fe, that’s the capital of New Mexico, and every year, the last weekend in April there is a national conference on the convergence of science and religion. Any of you who come from a scientific background you know this is surely one of the most exciting things happening. After the enlightenment, for some reason, we considered science the enemy of religion. And now in many cases we find your great scientists to be open to mystery, to non-dual thinking, to living with relativity to mystery, to both. Light being a particle and a wave, for example. They can live with hypothesis. It seems much easier than we clergy can. We can’t live with hypothesis, we have to have an answer for everything that settles the dust.

So I went to such a conference, where these brilliant gathering of PhDs. It was so expensive I wasn’t going to go, but a doctor paid my way and said, “Richard, you’ve got to hear these guys”. Well, there were four lectures a day, and usually after the second lecture I was so brain-dead from excitement and stretching of my awareness of the cosmos and universe we live in, that I just had to go back to my hotel room and journalise.

On the second day, the speaker was a Jewish Rabbi, and a scientist too. And he said amongst other things, “You know, you Christians, never really understood the meaning of the commandment to not take the name of God in vain, you seem to think that it means you shouldn’t say ‘God Damn you’. It isn’t very nice to say and I hope you don’t say it to anyone, but it doesn’t even come close to the meaning of the commandment. Vannas(?), or emptiness, to speak in vain, to speak with emptiness, is in fact to speak the name at all.”

When you use the name God, don’t use, don’t speak it, because you think you will know what you are talking about and you don’t. It’s always mystery. It’s always beyond, beyond, beyond, and any box you build will be too small of a box.   (Rabbi or RR?)

Wow. Now I knew, and I’m sure you’ve been told, but we don’t know for how many centuries this was strictly followed. But we do know for a certain amount of time it was followed and that is, we never spoke with our lips the sacred name Yahweh and it was during that period that the word elohim and adoni because the sacred name was never to be spoken.

Then he went on and he said if any of you studied Hebrew, you know this is true, but when you write Hebrew, all you write are the consonants and what it means to be an educated Jew, is that your eye automatically fills in the appropriate vowels and there are four consonants in the sacred name Yahweh, and he said, “Did you know that those consonants if correctly pronounced do not allow you to close your lips or use your tongue”. In fact the reason the name could not be spoken is it could only be breathed, in fact the sacred name Yahweh was an attempt to imitate and replicate the sound of inhalation and exhalation. (Fr Richard slowly breathes in and out several times with a whispering sound.)

He did it about 30 times in this crowd of PhDs and I’m not exaggerating. But at the end of it I heard sobbing in the room, that people got it. God is as available as the breath, the air, the wind and the words are the same in many languages.  Ironically, paradoxically, truthfully, was there some intuition here? The one thing you have done since you came out of your mother’s body is take in that breath and put it out, and you are doing it now. It’s the only constant, along with the beating of the heart. The beating of the heart starts even before.

Breathing is uniquely the phenomenon of this world and of course that moment comes, and we’ll all be there one day, and we’ll take in that breath for the last time. This could change your life, it can certainly change your prayer life. Because now you know that prayer is not something so much you do it’s something that’s done to you. You allow it. You say yes to it. You bring it to consciousness. You bring it to awareness. You awaken to the mystery and the miracle that is happening around you, within you and through you, all the time.

And then I finally understood why Paul says in two of his letters, “Pray always”. I tried and I couldn’t say Our Fathers or Hail Mary’s all day. It just didn’t work. Because we have defined prayer largely in a verbal way – in saying words to God. Then I realized, as I try to do this practice myself, and found it allowing me to live in the “naked now”, without my opinions, my judgements, my fears, my angers and my agenda.

To simply live in the moment and to be present to the moment in all that it offers. I realise and I hope you already have, that there isn’t a Catholic or protestant way of breathing. There’s not an Australian or an American way of breathing. There’s not a Chinese or an Iraqi way of breathing. There’s not a gay or a straight way of breathing. This just becomes too big a world, too big a truth, maybe we don’t even want it.

Maybe we don’t want a God who is that good a news, who is that giving, who is that accessible, who can really change us that much, on whose life we, moment by moment, second by second, depend. I give you this gift. Some of you will forget it as you walk out the door, but a handful of you will try it. Maybe, I hope, even more than a handful. It works for me, like last night waking up with jetlag all night, & I just go back to my breath, & I’m out of my racing mind into my body, where God it seems has chosen to dwell as a tabernacle.  And there I can rest, there I can be grounded, there I can trust. There love comes much more easily. See, the mind space is always closing down, but the heart space just desires to be open. It desires to receive what is, as it is, moment by moment.

This I offer to you, surely, possibly, I think, the most solid & most universal foundation for a lay spirituality.

If the Christian church is to continue on its path of renewal, if it is to continue to discover its own depth and its own breadth and its own beauty and its own possibility for the world it’s going to come from such transformed people. Not people who just have right ideas, but people who live inside of the world in a new way, that is much bigger and much broader than just ideas. As Jesus puts it, “Loving with your whole heart, your whole soul, your whole mind, your whole body and with your whole strength”. When all of that can come together, and it doesn’t come together naturally, usually we are eliminating one part of our self, but whenever all of you is there, you’re praying. Where all of you is there, whatever you are doing is giving glory to God. That is the work of much spirituality.

Because what we tend to do is eliminate the body, we eliminate the mind, eliminate the heart. We can never allow them all to live together in one gracious symphony. That is the work of your whole life. It doesn’t happen by 15, it doesn’t happen by 25, and I guess I have to say it doesn’t happen by 66, except now and then. All it needs to happen is once in a while, just enough so you know it’s true, and hence forward God is not out there, which is innocuous religion when God is no longer out there, and not just in here but in all creation, in everything that lives. What you experience is what the same Thomas Merton said so well, “When you finally know, what you will know is that the gate of heaven is everywhere”.   

It was both St Francis and St Ignatius who told both of their communities and became the motto of both of our communities, “To see God in all things”. My God and everything else. When you can see that broadly and that deeply, when you can see through that veil, secretly joyfully and clearly, you will have seen, and you will have seen indeed.     -END-

RP: Yah……weh = the first, final & ultimate breath-mantra!


Wish me a good death as I wish you: ‘A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning’ – poem by John Donne

As virtuous men pass mildly away, And whisper to their souls, to go,

Whilst some of their sad friends do say,’The breath goes now,’ and some say, ‘No:’
Marion and I knew a wonderfully spiritual woman the report of whose passing was as Donne writes.  Her name was Florence, a nurse in the 1st WW –  and she was held as a baby in the arms of  Abdu’l-Baha!


#breath, #breathe-matters, #interspirituality